Hockey Doc

The Hockey Doc: Hip pointers

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I was checked hard into the boards and have a big bruise on the outside of my hip. It’s very painful and I have difficulty in extending my stride. How can I get back to skating normally? 

Answer: The injury you have described is consistent with a “hip pointer.” Hip pointers are very painful and can make it extremely difficult to skate and even walk. Hip pointers are caused by damage to the muscles which allow you to lift your leg away from your body (hip abductors). Injuries to these muscles can make it difficult to cross over your leg when skating, to perform on-ice transitions, and for your trailing leg to have a long stride.

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The Hockey Doc: Hip arthritis and skating

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I am a 50-year-old who developed hip arthritis 18 months ago. I attempted to play through my injury for six months, but then I had to stop. After a thorough workup, I was sent to rehabilitation and after this I have almost no pain. While I have hip stiffness and tightness and the decreased motion, I would like to try and skate again. Do you think this is possible? 

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Hip arthritis and skating

The Hockey Doc: Evaluating and removing injured players from the ice

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: What is the best protocol to evaluate and remove injured athletes from the ice?

Answer: This is a very important topic because the initial treatment of an injured athlete can be very important to their ultimate outcome. At a college hockey game in Grand Forks in 2010, proper training and attention to detail saved the life of a player with a C2 neck fracture, which is usually 95% fatal. In the evaluation of an injured athlete, especially one that may have been checked from behind or  tripped into the boards, it is first important to do a basic safety evaluation starting with an ABC evaluation.

A.B.C. stands for Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. If an athlete is unconscious, it is important to verify they are breathing and also to check their pulse. For any athlete who does not appear to have the normal ABC’s, the basics of CPR should be initiated by qualified providers.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Evaluating and removing injured players from the ice

The Hockey Doc: Groin pain and femoroacetabular impingement

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I play goalie and have had hip and groin pain for the past couple weeks with the increasing number of saves during practice. What could be the cause?

Answer: Hip pain can have several different causes, but one common cause of groin and hip pain in hockey players is femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). It is often found in athletes that engage in repetitive hip movements involving excessive range of motion.

In hockey goalies, the injury can occur in goalies when they do the butterfly maneuver and turn their foot in. It typically happens gradually, over several years, so hockey players may not notice their hips getting stiff.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Groin pain and femoroacetabular impingement

The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I had a nagging groin pain much of last season. What can I do to try to prevent it from acting up again this year?

Answer: Most true adductor strains, commonly called groin strains, resolve within a couple weeks after injury. True adductor strains most commonly occur at the junction between the muscle and the tendon and resolve with rest, icing, stretching, and hip adductor exercises.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias