Hockey Doc

The Hockey Doc: Groin pain and femoroacetabular impingement

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I play goalie and have had hip and groin pain for the past couple weeks with the increasing number of saves during practice. What could be the cause?

Answer: Hip pain can have several different causes, but one common cause of groin and hip pain in hockey players is femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). It is often found in athletes that engage in repetitive hip movements involving excessive range of motion.

In hockey goalies, the injury can occur in goalies when they do the butterfly maneuver and turn their foot in. It typically happens gradually, over several years, so hockey players may not notice their hips getting stiff.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Groin pain and femoroacetabular impingement

The Hockey Doc: Evaluating and removing injured players from the ice

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: What is the best protocol to evaluate and remove injured athletes from the ice?

Answer: This is a very important topic because the initial treatment of an injured athlete can be very important to their ultimate outcome. At a college hockey game in Grand Forks in 2010, proper training and attention to detail saved the life of a player with a C2 neck fracture, which is usually 95% fatal. In the evaluation of an injured athlete, especially one that may have been checked from behind or  tripped into the boards, it is first important to do a basic safety evaluation starting with an ABC evaluation.

A.B.C. stands for Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. If an athlete is unconscious, it is important to verify they are breathing and also to check their pulse. For any athlete who does not appear to have the normal ABC’s, the basics of CPR should be initiated by qualified providers.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Evaluating and removing injured players from the ice

The Hockey Doc: High ankle sprains

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: One of my skates got twisted outwards during a collision and now I have pain just above my ankle. I don’t have any fractures on x-rays, but I have been told I have a high ankle sprain. What is this and when can I get back to playing hockey?

Read more: The Hockey Doc: High ankle sprains

The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I had a nagging groin pain much of last season. What can I do to try to prevent it from acting up again this year?

Answer: Most true adductor strains, commonly called groin strains, resolve within a couple weeks after injury. True adductor strains most commonly occur at the junction between the muscle and the tendon and resolve with rest, icing, stretching, and hip adductor exercises.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias

The Hockey Doc: Preparation for tryouts

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: What can I do to best prepare for hockey tryouts?

Answer: The best way to perform at a high level during hockey tryouts is to stay hydrated and participate in proper endurance conditioning beforehand. With the return to the ice rinks for dryland training and hockey tryouts, it is important to recognize that many early season activities put athletes at risk for dehydration and a subsequent loss of their competitive edge. The major risk factors for dehydration include hockey players’ inability to release heat efficiently if poorly conditioned, and improper fluid replacement. Prescription medications, supplements (such as Ephedra), and medical conditions (such as recent fevers, sleep deprivation, asthma, sunburn, and being overweight) may also increase your risk of dehydration and significantly decrease your performance.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Preparation for tryouts