Hockey Doc

The Hockey Doc: Quads contusions

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: Last week while going down to stop a puck at the point, I got hit in my thigh. I am having trouble bending my knee and my thigh is swollen. What can I do to speed my return to playing hockey?

Answer: It sounds like you have experienced a severe bruising on the front of your thigh, an injury called “quads contusion.” These injuries are very common in ice hockey, especially in defensemen. They are most often due to a puck hitting the thigh, which causes bleeding into the quadriceps muscles.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Quads contusions

The Hockey Doc: PCL injuries

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I was checked and landed hard on the ice with my knee bent, which caused knee pain and swelling. I was told that I have a tear of my posterior cruciate ligament. What can I do to return back to playing hockey?

Read more: The Hockey Doc: PCL injuries

The Hockey Doc: Skate bite

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I have been skating in new skates I just received for Christmas. I have been having more and more pain and swelling over the front part of my ankle every time I skate. What should I do for this?

Answer: The problem that you are describing is commonly called “skate bite” or “lace bite.” Skate bite is almost always due to an unbroken in pair of skates being worn for the first few times. It usually occurs early in the hockey season in players with new skates or inflexible old skates, or in the middle of the season for players who receive a new pair of skates for Christmas.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Skate bite

The Hockey Doc: MCL injuries

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: During my last game I was hit on the outside of my leg and immediately had pain on the inside of my knee. I was told that I have a Grade II MCL tear. What can I do to get back to the ice?

Answer: It appears that you have partially torn the medial collateral ligament, also called the MCL. The MCL is one of the strongest ligaments in the body. It is on the inside of the knee and attaches the tibia to the femur. It is most commonly injured when a skater sustains a direct contact injury to the outside of their knee which stresses and ultimately tears the ligaments on the inside of the knee.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: MCL injuries

The Hockey Doc: ACL tears

 

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I tore my ACL playing soccer this fall. Can I play hockey without surgery? If I have the surgery right now, can I play hockey later this year?

Answer: One of the most frequently asked questions that I encounter is when anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in hockey players should be reconstructed. The ACL is essential to providing stability to the knee for twisting, pivoting, and cutting activities. When an athlete has an ACL tear, the knee can actually partially dislocate with a significant twisting episode. Every time this happens, either the cartilage at the end of the bone or one of the menisci can be torn. More than 50 percent of athletes have been found to have torn their menisci or damaged their cartilage if they try and play through a season, so one should be carefully evaluated as to whether or not it is safe to skate through a season without an intact ACL.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: ACL tears