Hockey Doc

The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: I had a nagging groin pain much of last season. What can I do to try to prevent it from acting up again this year?

Answer: Most true adductor strains, commonly called groin strains, resolve within a couple weeks after injury. True adductor strains most commonly occur at the junction between the muscle and the tendon and resolve with rest, icing, stretching, and hip adductor exercises.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Groin strains and sports hernias

The Hockey Doc: High ankle sprains

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: One of my skates got twisted outwards during a collision and now I have pain just above my ankle. I don’t have any fractures on x-rays, but I have been told I have a high ankle sprain. What is this and when can I get back to playing hockey?

Read more: The Hockey Doc: High ankle sprains

The Hockey Doc: Early-season strength and conditioning

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: Some of my teammates and other players I know were sidelined last season, not because of contact injuries, but with sports hernias, groin pulls, low back pain and Osgood-Schlatter’s syndrome. As I start the season, what training or exercises can I do to avoid these injuries?

Answer: Our therapists recommend pre-season and early season training programs focusing on flexibility to improve mobility, muscle coordination and control to improve stability, good form during strength training, and short interval cardiovascular training. Programs that combine all four of these components should be tailored to age, skill level, previous injury and the time of the athletic season (preseason vs. early vs. late).

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Early-season strength and conditioning

The Hockey Doc: Preparation for tryouts

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

 

Question: What can I do to best prepare for hockey tryouts?

Answer: The best way to perform at a high level during hockey tryouts is to stay hydrated and participate in proper endurance conditioning beforehand. With the return to the ice rinks for dryland training and hockey tryouts, it is important to recognize that many early season activities put athletes at risk for dehydration and a subsequent loss of their competitive edge. The major risk factors for dehydration include hockey players’ inability to release heat efficiently if poorly conditioned, and improper fluid replacement. Prescription medications, supplements (such as Ephedra), and medical conditions (such as recent fevers, sleep deprivation, asthma, sunburn, and being overweight) may also increase your risk of dehydration and significantly decrease your performance.

Read more: The Hockey Doc: Preparation for tryouts

The Hockey Doc: MCL injuries of the elbow

By Dr. Rob LaPrade
http://drrobertlaprademd.com

Question: I was checked into the boards and my arm was jammed when something hit the outside of my elbow. Now I have pain and it seems to gap on the inside of my elbow. What is wrong what can I do to treat it?

Read more: The Hockey Doc: MCL injuries of the elbow